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Rice Open Access FAQs

Page history last edited by sk60@rice.edu 7 years, 6 months ago

Frequently Asked Questions about the Rice University Open Access Policy

  1. General Questions about Open Access
    1. What is open access?
    2. What’s the difference between open access and open source?
    3. What other research universities have open access policies?
    4. Where can I find more information about open access?
  2. General Questions about Rice’s Open Access Policy
    1. Who is covered by the policy?
    2. Does the policy apply to publications I wrote before the policy was adopted?
    3. What does Rice do with the publications?
    4. What version of their articles should faculty submit to comply with the policy?
    5. How does the policy apply to one or more co-authors outside Rice?
    6. What kinds of writings are covered by the policy?
    7. What if my article is already openly available?
    8. My department/lab maintains its own publication database. Is this sufficient for complying with the policy?
    9. How will people cite my work if it is published in more than one place?
    10. How will people find my article once it’s openly available?
    11. How do I benefit from complying with the policy?
    12. Do I need to make my work available immediately?
    13. How will my contributed scholarship be formatted?
  3. How to Comply with Rice’s Open Access Policy
    1. How do I submit my publication to the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA)?
  4. Opting Out (Obtaining a Waiver)
    1. Why is there an “opt out” option?
    2. How do I request a waiver?
  5. Effect of the Open Access Policy on Publishing and Publishers
    1. What effect does the policy have on the ability of faculty to publish in journals of their choice?
    2. Does the policy hurt small publishers?
    3. My publisher charges a fee for open access. Do I have to pay it to comply with the policy?
  6. The Impact of Rice’s Open Access Policy on Intellectual Property
    1. Is Rice taking the copyright to my publications?
    2. Does the policy increase my vulnerability to piracy of my intellectual property?
    3. What if my publisher requires me to transfer my copyright?
    4. Can I deposit an article that contains copyrighted images?

 

General Questions about Open Access

 

What is open access?

 

Open access refers to creative work or scholarship that is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Work that is open access is freely available online to anyone with an Internet connection.

 

 

What’s the difference between open access and open source?

 

Open source refers to software that makes source code freely available for analysis and modification. Open access more broadly addresses issues of access and reusability of scholarship.

 

 

What other research universities have open access policies?

 

Numerous institutions have adopted open access policies, including the University of California system, MIT, Duke, Harvard, Princeton, Emory, and Trinity University. A current list of institutions with open access policies can be found at The Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies (ROARMAP).

 

 

Where can I find more information about open access?

 

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Consortium (SPARC) provides a number of useful resources about open access and other scholarly communications issues.

 

Additional resources include:

 

 

General Questions about Rice’s Open Access Policy

 

Who is covered by the policy?

 

Because this is a policy passed by the Faculty Senate, all Senate-represented faculty are covered by the policy. Other Rice authors, such as graduate students and post-docs, are not covered. However, if they have articles co-authored by faculty, they can encourage faculty to deposit them.

 

 

Does the policy apply to publications I wrote before the policy was adopted?

 

No. Publications or publishing agreements that were signed prior to adoption of the policy (April 2012) do not fall under this policy. Authors may, however, deposit past publications in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive.

 

 

What does Rice do with the publications?

 

Rice deposits publications in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA), an institutional repository managed by Fondren Library. Publications deposited under the Open Access Policy reside in the RDSA long-term, where they are backed up and preserved. Contents of the RDSA are made available to Internet search engines, including Google, Google Scholar, and OAIster (which searches across millions of open access resources). Fondren is committed to maintain the RDSA’s longevity and functionality.

 

 

What version of their articles should faculty submit to comply with the policy?

 

The version depends on the publisher. Some publishers allow deposit of the final, published version. Many others request that the “post-print”—the final manuscript submitted to the publisher after peer-review but before type-setting. Fondren’s Open Access  website provides additional information about manuscript versions.

 

The library can work with you to determine the correct version to include in the in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA). Email us at openaccess@rice.edu. You can also find additional information about publisher self-archiving policies at SHERPA/RoMEO.

 

 

How does the policy apply to one or more co-authors outside Rice?

 

Each co-author holds copyright in the article and, individually, can grant Rice a non-exclusive license to deposit the article in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA).

 

If you are one of multiple authors, you should inform your co-authors of the policy and of any work deposited under the policy. If your co-authors object to the article’s deposit, you should request that a waiver for the article be granted.

 

 

What kinds of writings are covered by the policy?

 

Only scholarly articles. The Budapest Open Access Initiative defines scholarly articles as those that “describe the fruits of research and that give to the world for the sake of inquiry and knowledge without expectation of payment.” Typically, scholarly articles include peer-reviewed scholarly journals and conference proceedings.

 

Of course, many Rice faculty produce scholarship that doesn’t fall under this limited definition, including books, magazine articles, poetry, lectures, videos, and other copyrighted works. Rice recognizes that these are of great value. However, they are typically created as part of different publishing and distribution methods that are not addressed by the Open Access Policy and hence are not covered by the policy.

 

Nevertheless, you may still be able to make work other than articles available in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA). Contact the library and openaccess@rice.edu and we’ll help you determine if your work can be deposited.

 

 

What if my article is already openly available?

 

This policy requires articles to be made available in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA). If your article is already published in an open access journal, or if it’s available in a repository like PubMed Central, arXiv, or SSRN, just provide the library the link or article’s unique identifier and library staff will deposit the article for you. Simply send an email to openaccess@rice.edu.

 

 

My department/lab maintains its own publication database. Is this sufficient for complying with the policy?

 

No. The publications also need to be deposited in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA), where they will be backed up and preserved for long-term access. However, there is no need for you to deposit the article more than once. Library staff will gladly work with you to develop a workflow that allows the library to harvest publications from existing websites or databases. Just contact us at openaccess@rice.edu.

 

How will people cite my work if it is published in more than one place?

 

Generally, citations should be to the authoritative publication. A link to the open access version may also be included. When a copy of the article is deposited in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA), the authoritative reference is included in the metadata record so that the article can be properly cited. In addition, the link to the final, published version of the article is included so that those who have a subscription to the journal can access the version of record, if desired.

 

How will people find my article once it’s openly available?

 

Most people find their ways to articles in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA) via general internet searches or using tools like Google Scholar. Open access repositories like the RDSA include information about each item in a standardized way that is easily crawled and understood by search engines.

 

How do I benefit from complying with the policy?

 

There are a number of advantages to making your research available through an institutional repository, like the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive, including:

  • Enabling researchers who lack access to expensive journals to read your work.
  • Allowing the public to access the work they often fund.
  • Enabling the freer flow of knowledge.
  • Articles may be cited more often.
  • Compliance with some funder guidelines (which are currently responding to the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s recent public access memo).   
  • Library manages long-term preservation and access so your work doesn’t disappear.
  • Increase visibility of your work.

 

Do I need to make my work available immediately?

 

The library accommodates embargoes required by publishers. The article is still deposited in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA) at the time of publication, but is not made available to users until the embargo has expired.

 

How will my contributed scholarship be formatted?

 

The format depends on the publisher’s policy. Some publishers allow deposit of the final, published pdf. Others allow deposit of the post-print, final, peer-reviewed manuscript that is submitted to the publisher for publication. This is often a word processor document and is not yet formatted by the publisher.

 

Fondren staff are happy to help you determine what version of your article is allowed by the publisher and can help to format your publications for deposit. Just contact us at openaccess@rice.edu.

 

Regardless of format, all scholarship deposited in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive includes the full publication information, including publisher information, as well as a link to the published version of the work (if available). This helps to ensure proper citation of scholarship and to allow those with a journal subscription to read the final, published version, if desired.

 

 

How to Comply with Rice’s Open Access Policy

 

 

How do I submit my publication to the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA)?

 

It’s easy! Simply email articles to openaccess@rice.edu. Alternatively, you can deposit them yourself in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive; contact openaccess@rice.edu.

 

The library is also exploring different ways to incorporate article deposits into existing faculty workflows to make it even simpler to comply with the Open Access Policy.

 

 

Opting Out (Obtaining a Waiver)

 

Why is there an “opt out” option?

 

The overall objective of the Open Access Policy is to make your research more visible and to acknowledge the work you have done at a broader level than can be achieved with costly subscription-only or for-purchase publishing. We recognize, however, that there may sometimes be other considerations where those interests would not necessarily be advanced through this policy. Sometimes, the inclusion of copyrighted materials in the work will prevent its open dissemination, or the agreement with the publisher may prevent open dissemination. Recognizing that there are legitimate exceptions, an opt-out waiver has been included as part of the policy.

 

How do I request a waiver?

 

You can request a waiver by filling out the web form found here.

 

 

Effect of the Open Access Policy on Publishing and Publishers

 

 

What effect does the policy have on the ability of faculty to publish in journals of their choice?

 

None. The policy does not direct authors to publish in a specific type of journal—it only requires faculty to place a copy of their article in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA). An opt-out option is available for those who publish in the small number of journals that require a policy waiver (see “Opting Out”).

 

Does the policy hurt small publishers?

 

No. The scholarly publishing industry is undergoing major changes, as publishers, authors, and libraries explore the best models for scholarly publishing and access in a digital environment. The unsustainable cost of many subscription journals and the demand—from both academic organizations and funding agencies—for increased public access to research is driving a shift toward open access.  Many publishers, including smaller publishers, are currently developing and testing new economic models for providing broader access to scholarship. Because many smaller publishers produce high quality, high demand journals, it is expected that they will continue to be competitive as the market trends toward open access.

 

In addition, there is no evidence that making articles openly accessible through an institutional repository causes libraries and individuals to cancel their subscriptions to scholarly journals. Instead, libraries often cancel journals to deal with the rising costs of journals, particularly from large, for-profit publishers. Arguing that “many large journal publishers have made the scholarly communication environment fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive," Harvard's Faculty Advisory Council urged faculty to submit their work to the university's open access repository and to publish in open access journals.

 

My publisher charges a fee for open access. Do I have to pay it to comply with the policy?

 

No. The publisher charges those fees to fund open access publication of your article on the journal’s website. The purpose of Rice’s Open Access Policy is to include a free open access option by archiving a version in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA). There is no fee associated with this option.

 

 

The Impact of Rice’s Open Access Policy on Intellectual Property

 

 

Is Rice taking the copyright to my publications?

 

No. You, as the author, retain your copyright unless and until you assign it to someone else (often, a publisher). The license granted to Rice under the policy is not an assignment or transfer of copyright. It just adds a provision to Rice’s existing Copyright Policy to make a certain published articles written by faculty available to open dissemination. You still retain ownership and complete control of the copyright in your writings.

 

Remember that the Open Access Policy was passed by Rice’s Faculty Senate, not the University administration. Rather than taking away rights, the policy is designed to help authors retain their rights—specifically, the right to make a copy of your work available, even when published in a toll-access journal. 

 

Does the policy increase my vulnerability to piracy of my intellectual property?

 

No. The policy deals with scholarship that is already covered by copyright. As such, the open access version (if different from the version of record) retains all the rights that exist in the case of traditional publication, including the ability to prosecute in cases of piracy or plagiarism. If anything, it will deter piracy by allowing access to a freely available version of the article that might otherwise be distributed unlawfully.

 

What if my publisher requires me to transfer my copyright?

 

As copyright holder, you are free to transfer your copyright to whomever you wish. However, the articles are subject to the non-exclusive license to Rice.

 

For situations in which a publishing agreement is in conflict with the license granted to Rice under its Open Access Policy, you may submit to the publisher a publishing agreement addendum (found here) that reconciles the conflict, choose to publish elsewhere, or obtain a waiver.

 

Authors should think carefully before transferring copyright to any publisher, and consider the benefits of a modified publication agreement. Many authors routinely modify their agreements to retain certain rights, and many publishers comply. 

 

Fondren staff are happy to help you negotiate publisher contracts or learn more about your copyright transfer options. Simply contact us at openaccess@rice.edu.

 

Can I deposit an article that contains copyrighted images?

 

This depends on if you had to obtain permission to use the images or if the usage is considered fair use. Library staff can help you to determine what uses are allowed. Contact us at openaccess@rice.edu.

 

If you signed an agreement to use images in the article, review the document(s) to see what usage is permitted. If the terms of the agreement do not allow public access to the image, there are several options, including:

  • Request permission from the copyright holder (the Library can help you with this).
  • Deposit a version of the article that doesn’t include the images. Remember that the link to the final, published version of the article is included in all articles deposited in the Rice Digital Scholarship Archive (RDSA) so that those who have a subscription to the journal can access the images.
  • Opt out of the policy by requesting a waiver.

 

 

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